Courses

General Education Classes

Fulfill General Education requirements with courses from Bellin College!

All undergraduate programs contain general education requirements which must be satisfied in order to earn a bachelor’s degree. Courses taken at Bellin College are transferable to most colleges and universities.

Note: If you are looking to take general education courses to transfer to another college or university, we recommend that you contact them ahead of time to make sure that the course will transfer.

General education course takers apply to Bellin College as a Non-degree Seeking Student.

 I’M READY TO APPLY

The selected general education courses provide the foundation for students to successfully complete the outcomes of baccalaureate education. Knowledge from the arts and sciences provides a diversity of thought about social, economic, political and other global perspectives that are essential in clinical decision-making. The liberal arts education experience supports the development of critical thinking as the basis for clinical judgment.  Concepts from these courses are integrated into the nursing, radiologic science and sonography curriculums to ensure a broad-based clinical practice.

Bellin College offers select courses that will satisfy specific general education requirements.

Summer 2017 Course Offerings 

BU 320: Foundations of Health Care Management: 3 credit

Summer: Online
Also offered: Fall semester (face-to-face), Spring semester (online)

This course expands the student’s knowledge of the organization and function of health care systems and their interrelationships. Concepts of planning, organizing, team building, staffing, and controlling will be discussed as they relate to the mission, values, and strategic initiatives of the system/organization. Quality improvement and the utilization of resources to deliver optimum health care at a reasonable cost will be addressed. (Business elective)

Non-degree Seeking Student Application
HS 308: Nemesis: Disease and the Battle to Defeat It: 3 credits

Summer semester: Online

This course focuses on several diseases that have been the scourge of mankind throughout history. It will examine the details of major diseases from the Black Death to Ebola. Students will look at the major characteristics of specific diseases and the social, political and economic impact on human populations in the United States and throughout the world. Students will also study the battle to prevent, conquer, or cure these diseases, and identify the primary personalities who fought these battles. (General elective or Humanities elective)

Non-degree Seeking Student Application
MA 240: Statistics: 4 credits

Summer semester: Online
Also offered: Spring semester (online)

This course introduces students to the basic statistical skills used in evidence-based health care research. Students will acquire the skills to analyze data using commonly employed computer packages to generate descriptive and inferential studies. Statistical techniques will include descriptive measures of central tendency, variation, and correlation and inferential tests including T-Testing and General Linear Models. (Statistics elective)

Non-degree Seeking Student Application
HC 202: Introduction to Integrative Health: 3 credits

Summer semester: Hybrid
Also offered: Spring semester (hybrid)

The course focuses on integrative health and lifestyle choices that have an impact on client-centered care with a variety of populations. Therapies such as common supplements, botanicals, vitamin/minerals, mind-body techniques, nutrition, and aromatherapy are explored. Specific cultural whole body approaches to health will also be explored along with societal views regarding integrative models of care. This course provides an introduction to integrative health, emphasizing the key role of lifestyle changes.

Non-degree Seeking Student Application
PH 202: Introduction to Medical Ethics: 3 credits

Summer semester: Online
Also offered: Fall semester (face-to-face)

The medical field is comprised of an almost inexhaustible array of ethical issues. In this class, we will lay the groundwork of ethical theory and then quickly analyze ethical issues in clinical practice and social justice issues in the medical field. We will then turn to particular ethical issues, such as organ transplantation, stem cell research, euthanasia, abortion, and genetic enhancement.

Non-degree Seeking Student Application


Fall 2017 Course Offerings 

BU 320: Foundations of Health Care Management: 3 credits

Fall semester: (face-to-face)
Also offered:  Spring semester (online); summer semester (online-8 weeks)

This course expands the student’s knowledge of the organization and function of health care systems and their interrelationships. Concepts of planning, organizing, team building, staffing, and controlling will be discussed as they relate to the mission, values, and strategic initiatives of the system/organization. Quality improvement and the utilization of resources to deliver optimum health care at a reasonable cost will be addressed. (Business elective)

HS 204: History of Health Care in the United States: 3 credits

Fall semester (online)
Also offered: Spring semester (online)

This course focuses on the history of health care in the United States, from bloodletting to the baccalaureate degrees, house calls to health maintenance organizations, exams to x-rays, and many topics in between. Students will explore the effects of major social and political milestones on the evolution of health care. Pharmacological advances, education, disease eradication, technology, the impact of war, and care delivery will be addressed. (Humanities elective)

PH 202: Introduction to Medical Ethics: 3 credits

Fall semester: Face-to-face

The medical field is comprised of an almost inexhaustible array of ethical issues. In this class, we will lay the groundwork of ethical theory and then quickly analyze ethical issues in clinical practice and social justice issues in the medical field. We will then turn to particular ethical issues, such as organ transplantation, stem cell research, euthanasia, abortion, and genetic enhancement.

BI 152: Principles of Biology: 4 credits (3 credits, theory; 1 credit, lab)

Fall semester: Face-to-face

This course introduces the student to living systems with an emphasis on molecular, cellular and tissue levels of organization, genetics, physiology, evolutionary theory, taxonomy, ecology, and biodiversity.

Laboratory exercises will place emphasis on the scientific process, cellular reproduction, patterns of inheritance, evolution, ecological systems and the environment.

EN 115: Composition and Professional Writing: 3 credits

Fall semester: Online

This course provides students with college-level writing skills and principles of description, narration, comparison analysis, research, persuasion, and APA formatting. The course also includes elements of professional and technical writing.

MA 101: Intermediate Algebra: 3 credits

Fall: Face-to-face

The course reviews basic algebraic techniques, including operations on polynomials and linear equations with applications. In addition, quadratic equations and applications, fractional expressions, and systems of linear equations will be covered.

MA 240: Statistics: 4 credits

Offered: Spring semester (online); Summer semester (online)

This course introduces students to the basic statistical skills used in evidence-based health care research. Students will acquire the skills to analyze data using commonly employed computer packages to generate descriptive and inferential studies. Statistical techniques will include descriptive measures of central tendency, variation, and correlation and inferential tests including T-Testing and General Linear Models. (Statistics elective)


Spring 2018 Course Offerings

BU 320: Foundations of Health Care Management: 3 credits

Offered: Spring semester (online)

This course expands the student’s knowledge of the organization and function of health care systems, and their interrelationships. Concepts of planning, organizing, team building, staffing, and controlling will be discussed as they relate to the mission, values, and strategic initiatives of the system/organization. Quality improvement and the utilization of resources to deliver optimum health care at a reasonable cost will be addressed. (Business elective)

DI 202: Diversity Issues in Health Care: 3 credits

Offered: Spring semester (hybrid)

This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to introduce the student to the historical, sociological, anthropological, and cultural resources for understanding the issues of diversity in health care in the America experience. It introduces the student to the ongoing issues of diversity which continue to be part of the practice of health care today. (Human Diversity elective)

HS 204: History of Health Care in the United States: 3 credits

Offered Spring semester (online)

This course focuses on the history of health care in the United States, from bloodletting to the baccalaureate degrees, house calls to health maintenance organizations, exams to x-rays, and many topics in between. Students will explore the effects of major social and political milestones on the evolution of health care. Pharmacological advances, education, disease eradication, technology, the impact of war, and care delivery will be addressed. (Humanities elective)

MA 240: Statistics: 4 credits

Offered: Spring semester (online)

This course introduces students to the basic statistical skills used in evidence-based health care research. Students will acquire the skills to analyze data using commonly employed computer packages to generate descriptive and inferential studies. Statistical techniques will include descriptive measures of central tendency, variation, and correlation and inferential tests including T-Testing and General Linear Models. (Statistics elective)

WR 114: Introduction to Professional Writing: 1 credit

Offered: Spring semester session 1

This course provides an overview of technical writing with applications for health care. Expository writing, which focuses on the communication of objective information, is emphasized. APA format and library resources are introduced. (Writing elective)

BI 252: Anatomy and Physiology: 5 credits (4 credits, theory; 1 credit, lab)

Offered: Spring semester (face-to-face)

This course introduces the student to an overview of the structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs and body systems as they relate to human health and biology, with an emphasis on how anatomical structure relates to physiological and pathological process. Laboratory exercises will place emphasis on anatomical terminology, histology, and gross anatomy as well as physiological measurements and analysis of variables.

HC 202: Introduction to Integrative Health: 3 credits

Offered: Spring (hybrid)

The course focuses on integrative health and lifestyle choices that have an impact on client-centered care with a variety of populations. Therapies such as common supplements, botanicals, vitamin/minerals, mind-body techniques, nutrition, and aromatherapy are explored. Specific cultural whole body approaches to health will also be explored along with societal views regarding integrative models of care. This course provides an introduction to integrative health, emphasizing the key role of lifestyle changes.

HD 300: Adulthood and Aging: 3 credits

Offered: Spring (online)

This course is designed to give students an accurate understanding of the psychological changes that individual’s experience as they grow across the adult life span: young adult, middle adulthood, and older adults. Students will examine the life span from an inter-professional perspective, stressing the interaction of physiological, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of human development while examining the dynamic forces that underlie and produce changes. The course will emphasize the need for identifying the ever-changing relationships between the individual and society that help to shape the experience of aging and emphasizing the topical areas in which psychological change occurs.

CH 125: General Chemistry: 4 credits (4 credits, theory; 1 credit, lab)

Offered: Spring (face-to-face)

This course provides the opportunity for the learner to develop the knowledge and the skills process in the understanding of general chemistry. Topics covered are: metric system, problem-solving, periodic relationships, chemical reactions, equilibrium, properties of water, acids, bases, salts and gas laws as well as an introduction to organic chemistry. Students focus on skill development, communication and problem solving. Critical thinking skills are developed as students learn to collect and analyze data and work out the correct solutions.

CH 125L: General Chemistry Lab (1 credit)

Offered: Spring (online)

This course provides the opportunity for the learner to develop the knowledge and the skills process in the understanding of the practical application of the principles of general chemistry in the laboratory. Topics covered are: Lab safety, metric system, conversion factors, density and specific gravity, familiarity with the use of the Bunsen burner, identifying cations through flame tests, periodic relationships, electron configurations, chemical reactions, mole ratios, properties of acids, bases and buffers as well as an introduction to organic chemistry using the ball and stick model kits. Students focus on skill development, communication and problem solving. Critical thinking skills are developed as students learn to collect and analyze data and work out the correct solutions.


Bellin College also accepts general education credits from accredited two and four-year institutions; as well as offers specific transfer agreements with certain colleges.

View Transfer Agreements

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